HIGH STRANGENESS
PETER STICHBURY
GALLERY BATON
SEOUL

OCTOBER 27, 2017 - NOVEMBER 30, 2017

'Hella Hammid remote viewing an elephant skeleton in a museum, 1983', 2017 Oil on linen 50 x 60 cm   PETER STICHBURY - HIGH STRANGENESS “We have seen UFOs as classical spaceships for a long time, in accordance with science fiction in the forties and fifties…. psychic effects reported by witnesses are considered either as evidence of mental weakness or as electromagnetic side effects. Yet, as documentation improves we find out that the physical aspects of the phenomenon are as negotiable as its psychic effects.” -Jacques Vallée, astrophysicist, computer scientist and UFO/UAP researcher Gallery Baton is delighted to announce ‘High Strangeness’, a solo exhibition by Peter Stichbury (b. 1969), from 27th October to 30th November in Apgujeong, Seoul. Stichbury has built a loyal audience in the US and Oceania, his portraits the visual accomplice to his elaborate, exhaustively researched case studies. This exhibition represents the first opportunity for the Asian and Korean audience to discover his work.   Stichbury has produced a series of works whose leitmotif is the psychological and physiological impact sustained by witnesses of mysterious aerial activity - known as Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP). He questions the validity of most reports, deeming them contaminated by subjective interpretation, Government disinformation, or erroneous speculation. Many are deliberate hoaxes. However a small proportion of cases which, while lacking tangible evidence, are unexplainable by conventional scientific methods, raise immeasurable speculation and mystery due to their ambiguous identity. It is these cases which spearhead his inquiry into this enigmatic phenomenon. For Stichbury the concept of the UAP is synonymous with literary conventions where a central incident significantly influences both the plot and the life paths of characters. In a novel the core event is the centrum from which the Butterfly Effect emanates, influencing relations between characters, and between character and plot, even though they may appear unrelated at first glance. Interpreted through this lens, the UAP plays a parallel role in Stichbury’s practice - from the core UAP event ripple outwards complex psychological effects within witnesses. They often report subsequent absurd ‘high strange’ parapsychological, physical and psychic experiences. These can include missing time, temporary paralysis, disorientation, synchronicities, unexplained sunburn, and Klieg conjunctivitis. Since 2014 Stichbury has been grappling with this subject, his fascination sparked by an experience in childhood of an object he could not identify moving slowly across the midday sky above him. Two previous museum shows on the subject, at La Casa Encendida, Spain in 2015, and Nevada Museum of Art in 2016 – 2017, have firmly established UAP as the current thematic focus of his practice. Rigorously researching media material, declassified Government documents from several nations, and video footage, the artist pays particular attention to photographic data, academic and Government reports, and video footage of individuals in their 20s and early 30s. He perceives a purity in this age group which he believes renders them a relatively uncontaminated vessel for the strange occurrences they embody. The fragile beauty of Stichbury’s figures contrasts with their discomforting, haunted gaze. This awkward juxtaposition points to a rupture in their accepted assumptions of what is real, as a result of their UAP encounter – a loss of belief in the consensus reality decided upon by humankind. His employment of exaggerated realism increases this impression of unreality and reveals further the internal disturbance of the characters. The combination of Stichbury’s perceptive inquiry, exceptional painting skill and personal childhood experience, which although faint, still remains in his memory, have produced a series which functions as a personal archive delivered via a complex theme and compelling aesthetic. This exhibition will attempt to share the artist’s journey and also offer viewers the opportunity to explore the UAP witness cases Stichbury has found so engrossing. Born in New Zealand, Peter Stichbury graduated from University of Auckland in 1997. He won the prestigious New Zealand art prize the Wallace Art Award in the same year. He has been presenting his work in leading international art institutions since, including Museum of New Zealand, Nevada Museum of Art, USA, La Casa Encendida, Spain, and Christchurch Art Gallery, New Zealand. Reviews of his work are published in several major art journals including Artforum and Modern Painters. Gallery Baton, Seoul 

'Hella Hammid remote viewing an elephant skeleton in a museum, 1983', 2017
Oil on linen
50 x 60 cm
 

PETER STICHBURY - HIGH STRANGENESS

“We have seen UFOs as classical spaceships for a long time, in accordance with science fiction in the forties and fifties…. psychic effects reported by witnesses are considered either as evidence of mental weakness or as electromagnetic side effects. Yet, as documentation improves we find out that the physical aspects of the phenomenon are as negotiable as its psychic effects.” -Jacques Vallée, astrophysicist, computer scientist and UFO/UAP researcher

Gallery Baton is delighted to announce ‘High Strangeness’, a solo exhibition by Peter Stichbury (b. 1969), from 27th October to 30th November in Apgujeong, Seoul. Stichbury has built a loyal audience in the US and Oceania, his portraits the visual accomplice to his elaborate, exhaustively researched case studies. This exhibition represents the first opportunity for the Asian and Korean audience to discover his work.  

Stichbury has produced a series of works whose leitmotif is the psychological and physiological impact sustained by witnesses of mysterious aerial activity - known as Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP). He questions the validity of most reports, deeming them contaminated by subjective interpretation, Government disinformation, or erroneous speculation. Many are deliberate hoaxes. However a small proportion of cases which, while lacking tangible evidence, are unexplainable by conventional scientific methods, raise immeasurable speculation and mystery due to their ambiguous identity. It is these cases which spearhead his inquiry into this enigmatic phenomenon.

For Stichbury the concept of the UAP is synonymous with literary conventions where a central incident significantly influences both the plot and the life paths of characters. In a novel the core event is the centrum from which the Butterfly Effect emanates, influencing relations between characters, and between character and plot, even though they may appear unrelated at first glance. Interpreted through this lens, the UAP plays a parallel role in Stichbury’s practice - from the core UAP event ripple outwards complex psychological effects within witnesses. They often report subsequent absurd ‘high strange’ parapsychological, physical and psychic experiences. These can include missing time, temporary paralysis, disorientation, synchronicities, unexplained sunburn, and Klieg conjunctivitis.

Since 2014 Stichbury has been grappling with this subject, his fascination sparked by an experience in childhood of an object he could not identify moving slowly across the midday sky above him. Two previous museum shows on the subject, at La Casa Encendida, Spain in 2015, and Nevada Museum of Art in 2016 – 2017, have firmly established UAP as the current thematic focus of his practice.

Rigorously researching media material, declassified Government documents from several nations, and video footage, the artist pays particular attention to photographic data, academic and Government reports, and video footage of individuals in their 20s and early 30s. He perceives a purity in this age group which he believes renders them a relatively uncontaminated vessel for the strange occurrences they embody.

The fragile beauty of Stichbury’s figures contrasts with their discomforting, haunted gaze. This awkward juxtaposition points to a rupture in their accepted assumptions of what is real, as a result of their UAP encounter – a loss of belief in the consensus reality decided upon by humankind. His employment of exaggerated realism increases this impression of unreality and reveals further the internal disturbance of the characters.

The combination of Stichbury’s perceptive inquiry, exceptional painting skill and personal childhood experience, which although faint, still remains in his memory, have produced a series which functions as a personal archive delivered via a complex theme and compelling aesthetic. This exhibition will attempt to share the artist’s journey and also offer viewers the opportunity to explore the UAP witness cases Stichbury has found so engrossing.

Born in New Zealand, Peter Stichbury graduated from University of Auckland in 1997. He won the prestigious New Zealand art prize the Wallace Art Award in the same year. He has been presenting his work in leading international art institutions since, including Museum of New Zealand, Nevada Museum of Art, USA, La Casa Encendida, Spain, and Christchurch Art Gallery, New Zealand. Reviews of his work are published in several major art journals including Artforum and Modern Painters.

Gallery Baton, Seoul 

Peter Stichbury
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GALLERY BATON
ART BRUSSELS

21 -23 APRIL 2017

KOEN VAN DEN BROEK
Koh San Kuem
PETER STICHBURY
MAX FRISINGER
Bae Yoon Hwan
Suzanne Song
Je Yeo Ran
OH YOU KYEONG
Chung Chi Yung
Yunchul Kim

 

 

Peter Stichbury

NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART
PETER STICHBURY:
ANATOMY OF A PHENOMENON

November 5, 2016 - May 28, 2017    
Feature Gallery North

New Zealand artist Peter Stichbury is fascinated by society’s ongoing obsession with UFO phenomena. He paints historical UFO sightings, as well as portraits of the people who purportedly saw them. With penetrating, but perplexing gazes, Stichbury’s subjects are caught in an alternate reality—forever changed by their sighting experience, but also influenced by the myths, disinformation, and conspiracy theories society imparts on such experiences.

Curator: JoAnne Northrup

 Mona Stafford, 1976, 2014                                               

 Mona Stafford, 1976, 2014                                               

ARE THEY OUT THERE?

Saturday February 04, 2017
2:00 PM  –  3:00 PM
Senior Astronomer and SETI researcher Dr. Seth Shostak bets that we will find extraterrestrial life in the next twenty-four years. Exploring the themes in Peter Stichbury’s Anatomy of a Phenomenon, Dr. Shostak will discuss society’s ongoing obsession with UFO phenomena, explain why new technologies and the laws of probability make the breakthrough likely and predict how the discovery of civilizations far more advanced than ours might affect us here on Earth.

Register here

Peter Stichbury
HUMAN CONDITION Curated by John Wolf The Hospital 2231 S Western Ave, Los Angeles Opening Reception: October 1, 2016 October 1 – November 30, 2016 www.humanconditionexhibition.com Daniel Arsham, Louise Bonnet, Polly Borland, Delia Brown, Greg Colson, Zoe Crosher, Gregory Crewdson, Mira Dancy, Marlene Dumas, Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Danny Fox, Nicole Eisenmann, Derek Fordjour, Louisa Gagliardi, Brendan Getz, Laurent Grasso, Heidi Hahn, Marc Horowitz, Ridley Howard, Leonhard Hurlmeier, Joshua Jefferson, Chantal Joffe, Jordan Kasey, Hoda Kashiha, Friedrich Kunath, Kelly Lamb, Tala Madani, Robert Mapplethorpe, Max Maslansky, Tony Matelli, Simon Mathers, John Millei, Marilyn Minter, Alice Neel, Laurie Nye, Jennifer Packer, Vernon Price, Tal R, Yves Scherer, Alexander Ruthner, Peter Stichbury, Claire Tabouret, Johan Tahon, Mateo Tannatt, Kenneth Tam, Henry Taylor, Ed Templeton, Mark Verabioff, Jessica Williams, Nicole Wittenberg, Bradley Wood   Human Condition is comprised of emerging and established artists from Los Angeles, New York, and Europe within an unusual context – an abandoned hospital (previously the LA Metropolitan Medical Center) in the bourgeoning West Adams district on the border of South Los Angeles. Home to many working artists, this exhibition, curated by John Wolf, strives to bring attention back to this culturally and historically rich area of Los Angeles. Once considered Los Angeles’ affluent neighborhood at the turn of the 20th century, its decay over the years due to the development of the 10 freeway, Hancock Park, Hollywood, and Beverly Hills, has recently made an upward turn with an increasing interest in redeveloping the area and a commitment to supporting the local art scene.  Human Condition will bring awareness to an underrepresented arts district on the brink of change. Using the community as a backdrop, the spaces functional history serves as the thread that binds the transient force of the human condition on the physical plane in this otherwise under-served area. Human Condition invites artists to explore emotional responses to the physical and psychological experience of an individual in its lifespan. Themes of joy, pain, trauma, and elation are all experienced within the same shell, similar to the exhibition space itself. The reaction to these emotional responses by viewers weaves through the narrative.Working within the context of a hospital is both an architectural investigation and rediscovery of the abundant resources left in this fertile neighborhood. Similar to the human form, both have the opportunity for redevelopment and change. The works chosen for Human Condition will be on display in various settings within the hospital.  Among the surgical rooms, maternity wards, psychiatric floor, cafeteria and foyer, artists will have the opportunity to work with the existing architecture, hospital furniture and the random remains of what has been left at the site. The works will range from sculpture, drawings, paintings, performance, and select immersive installations that draw inspiration from what once was enabling the viewer to transcend and draw a subjective narrative from the unsettling and dilapidated surroundings. The Human Condition is a unique opportunity for both artists and audiences to experience artwork outside of the confines of a white box and in a familiar yet strange platform.

HUMAN CONDITION
Curated by John Wolf
The Hospital
2231 S Western Ave, Los Angeles
Opening Reception: October 1, 2016
October 1 – November 30, 2016

www.humanconditionexhibition.com

Daniel Arsham, Louise Bonnet, Polly Borland, Delia Brown, Greg Colson, Zoe Crosher, Gregory Crewdson, Mira Dancy, Marlene Dumas, Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Danny Fox, Nicole Eisenmann, Derek Fordjour, Louisa Gagliardi, Brendan Getz, Laurent Grasso, Heidi Hahn, Marc Horowitz, Ridley Howard, Leonhard Hurlmeier, Joshua Jefferson, Chantal Joffe, Jordan Kasey, Hoda Kashiha, Friedrich Kunath, Kelly Lamb, Tala Madani, Robert Mapplethorpe, Max Maslansky, Tony Matelli, Simon Mathers, John Millei, Marilyn Minter, Alice Neel, Laurie Nye, Jennifer Packer, Vernon Price, Tal R, Yves Scherer, Alexander Ruthner, Peter Stichbury, Claire Tabouret, Johan Tahon, Mateo Tannatt, Kenneth Tam, Henry Taylor, Ed Templeton, Mark Verabioff, Jessica Williams, Nicole Wittenberg, Bradley Wood

 

Human Condition is comprised of emerging and established artists from Los Angeles, New York, and Europe within an unusual context – an abandoned hospital (previously the LA Metropolitan Medical Center) in the bourgeoning West Adams district on the border of South Los Angeles. Home to many working artists, this exhibition, curated by John Wolf, strives to bring attention back to this culturally and historically rich area of Los Angeles. Once considered Los Angeles’ affluent neighborhood at the turn of the 20th century, its decay over the years due to the development of the 10 freeway, Hancock Park, Hollywood, and Beverly Hills, has recently made an upward turn with an increasing interest in redeveloping the area and a commitment to supporting the local art scene. 

Human Condition will bring awareness to an underrepresented arts district on the brink of change. Using the community as a backdrop, the spaces functional history serves as the thread that binds the transient force of the human condition on the physical plane in this otherwise under-served area.

Human Condition invites artists to explore emotional responses to the physical and psychological experience of an individual in its lifespan. Themes of joy, pain, trauma, and elation are all experienced within the same shell, similar to the exhibition space itself. The reaction to these emotional responses by viewers weaves through the narrative.Working within the context of a hospital is both an architectural investigation and rediscovery of the abundant resources left in this fertile neighborhood. Similar to the human form, both have the opportunity for redevelopment and change.

The works chosen for Human Condition will be on display in various settings within the hospital.  Among the surgical rooms, maternity wards, psychiatric floor, cafeteria and foyer, artists will have the opportunity to work with the existing architecture, hospital furniture and the random remains of what has been left at the site. The works will range from sculpture, drawings, paintings, performance, and select immersive installations that draw inspiration from what once was enabling the viewer to transcend and draw a subjective narrative from the unsettling and dilapidated surroundings. The Human Condition is a unique opportunity for both artists and audiences to experience artwork outside of the confines of a white box and in a familiar yet strange platform.

Peter Stichbury

Tracy Williams, Ltd. New York
People, Places, Things
7 July - 27 July 2016

Brent Holland Baker, Sue de Beer, Birgit Brenner, Richard Dupont, Nicole Eisenman, 
Judith Eisner, Greg Fadell, Anthony Gormley, Deborah Kass, Mary Reid Kelley, 
Jeff Koons, Damian Loeb, Robert Longo, Yasumasa Morimora, Matt Mullican, 
Vik Muniz, Paulina Olowska, Peter Stichbury, Kara Walker

Peter Stichbury

BAD HAIR DAY
Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu
Curator: Ken Hall

A salute to the bearded, balding and bewigged. Highlighting heads and hairstyles from a span of over two-thousand years, Christchurch Art Gallery's upcoming exhibition is a playful take on everything from sideburns to split ends. Featuring more than 60 works, Bad Hair Day examines the changing expressions of hair through an eccentric compilation traversing time and trend. Gallery Director Jenny Harper says subversive humour plays an important part in many of the works, Bad Hair Day weaves an unpredictable path through a variety of works and media, from historical painting to contemporary photography and video.

Leo Bensemann, Otto Dix, William Hogarth, Anthony McKee, John Theodore Heins, Yvonne Todd
Steve Carr, George Moutard Woodward & Thomas Rowlandson, Ede & Ravenscroft London, Gavin Hurley, Claudius Brassington, Gavin Hipkins, Laurent Joseph Olivier, Marie Seymour Lucas,  Pierre Auguste Renoir, Rembrandt van Rijn, Robert Walker, Heather Straka, James Lawson Balfour, Gregor Kregar, Kennaway Henderson, Anne Noble, Peter Stichbury, Eric Gill, Elsie White, Jacques Callot, Toyohara Chikanobu, David Cook, Jason Greig, Siliga David Setoga, Rita Angus, Lucas van Leyden, Joan Dukes, Heather Busch, Liyen Chong, Patrick Pound, William Blake, Roger Boyce, Ronnie van Hout. 

4 June 2016 – 28 May 2017

Peter Stichbury

101 Works of Art : Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu

In this large, beautifully presented book, Christchurch Art Gallery showcases 101 treasures from its collection – paintings, drawings, sculpture, film and photographs that stand out in a line-up of New Zealand’s most significant collected works. Enjoy thoughtful, conversational texts by Lara Strongman, Ken Hall, Felicity Milburn, Nathan Pohio, Peter Vangioni and Jenny Harper – written to feel as if the reader is standing with the curator in front of the painting. Also includes insightful interviews with artists and curators.
Order by emailing shop@christchurchartgallery.org.nz

 

NDE, Felicity Milburn
101 Works of Art,
catalog
Christchurch Art Gallery
2015 

It’s odd when your immediate reaction to a painting is to look away and over your shoulder instead. That’s how I felt when I first encountered Peter Stichbury’s unsettling NDE. When someone fixates anxiously on a point behind you it is undeniably off-putting - a classic schoolyard ploy – and what’s more, it disrupts comfortable art viewing protocols: rather than returning, or receiving, our gaze,  the immaculate woman’s intense concentration elsewhere makes our presence seem somehow superfluous. It’s creepy intriguing and, yes, even a little insulting.

NDE made its first public appearance as a glowing, seven-meter-wide billboard on Christchurch Art Gallery’s exterior as part of our post-earthquake Outer Spaces program. Looming over Worcester Boulevard, her unnerving gaze rested squarely on the Christchurch City Council’s Civic offices, and no sooner was she installed than we began receiving expressions of alarm via our blog:

At 12:28 PM on 19/04/2013, Gus wrote: The painting is scaring people.
At 8:14 PM on 19/04/2013, Gus wrote: This is spooky! Take it down!

Mission accomplished, Stichbury may well have thought, given he’d previously admitted his hope that NDE would ‘induce an uneasy response, like witnessing a UFO’. The artist, in fact, had been managing some anxieties of his own – this was his first public artwork and also the first time he’s made a painting with the intention that it be translated into vinyl and blown up dramatically in scale. From his comments at the time, it’s clear the work received even more than his usual forensic attention to detail: 
‘It feels slightly strange knowing it will be transformed into a huge illumination. All those small hairs and tiny details I’ve been sweating over will end up as scruffy foot-long gestural brushstrokes. I should really be painting with a microscope. Actually, once it’s blown up, even the linen will look like the moon’s surface.’

Back in the Gallery, the subsequently acquired original exudes an enigmatic perfection reminiscent of Hitchcock’s icy blondes, though closer scrutiny suggests she might have more in common with the fretful, too-perfect, ‘valids’ of Gattaca, Andrew Niccol’s 1997 sci-fi classic about a eugenically designed society.  That initial, synthetic flawlessness unravels further every moment, revealing a series of subtle manipulations calculated to maximize our discomfort. First, those haunted, haunting eyes – enlarged and widened in the chilling ‘objective’ tradition of Lucian Freud, who Stichbury cites as a key influence – but also sunken, red rimmed and ringed with shadows.  And the strangely ambiguous look within them – is this a woman who is startled, afraid or merely processing some life-changing new information? Her clothing (chic trench or lab coat?) is similarly inconclusive. Our viewpoint is so low and close we can almost see her pupils dilate, and Stichbury’s fascination with testimonies of near death experience, documented and analyzed in countless internet forums. Across age, gender and religion, several core motifs recur: a sensation of bodily detachment, a feeling of serenity and the presence of a light, traveled through or toward. Have we stumbled across someone on the cusp of the hereafter? Her implied, inaudible gasp seems to support it. Whatever she has seen or experienced, it has, at least temporarily, removed her from our sphere into another – leaving us uncomfortably close, but worlds apart.

Peter Stichbury


        UNTITLED, Miami Beach 2015

        TRACY WILLIAMS Ltd, New York : Booth A01
        Judy Ledgerwood
        Jeanne Silverthorne
        Peter Stichbury
        Simryn Gill

 

Peter Stichbury

KIAF 2015 / Art Seoul

GALLERY BATON : Booth B-127

Koen van den Broek
Rosa Loy
Dirk Braeckman
Peter Stichbury
San Keum KOH
Sang Gyun KIM
David O’Kane
Woo Hyuk BIN
Suk One YOON
Chi Yung CHUNG
Paolo Ventura
Max Frisinger
Andreas Gefeller
Stef Driesen
Axel Geis

 

Peter Stichbury

La exposición ARSTRONOMY. Incursiones en el cosmos, comisariada por Danielle Tilkin, nos sumerge en el complejo mundo del cosmos a través de su reflejo en el arte contemporáneo. Los viajes espaciales, lo astral, lo cósmico, lo científico y lo ufológico son temas presentes en el arte del siglo XX que han sido fuente fundamental de inspiración para muchos creadores y que se ven materializados en esta exposición.

ARSTRONOMY reflexiona sobre la unión entre la ciencia, la imaginación, la tecnología y el arte mediante la obra de más de treinta artistas: Alfonso Borragán, Pamela Breda, Michael Buthe, Robert Dimatteo, EVRU, Laurent Grasso, Greatest Hits, Keith Haring, Susan Hiller, Mike Kelley, William Kentridge, Yves Klein, Július Koller, Gyula Kosice, Paul Laffoley, Robert Llimós, Abu Bakarr Mansaray, Tony Oursler, Trevor Paglen, Panamarenko, Sigmar Polke, Joan Rabascall, Rotraut, Thomas Ruff, Nicolas Schoffer, Bob Smith, Peter Stichbury, Thomas Struth, Ionel Talpazan, Mark Tansey, Paul van Hoeydonck, Angelo Vermeulen, Anton Vidokle, William Adjété Wilson y Michael Zansky.

Este catálogo digital incluye, además del texto de la comisaria, aportaciones de destacados especialistas, como Chris Aubeck, fundador del colectivo de investigación histórica Magonia Exchange, y el pensador y escritor alemán Boris Groys.  La Casa Encendida, 2015

Authors: Danielle Tilkin , Borys Groys and Chris Aubeck

Download free catalog / Descárgate gratis el catálogo.

Peter Stichbury

ARSTRONOMY. Incursions into the cosmos. La Casa Encendida, Madrid, Spain.  14 May - 30 Aug 2015

Paul van Hoeydonck, Joan Rabascall, Yves Klein, Rotraut, Julius Koller, Sigmar Polke, Panamarenko, Paul Laffoley, Mark Tansey, E.M.S. Evrugo mental state, Robert Llimós, Michael Zansky, Bob Smith, Susan Hiller, Thomas Ruff, Thomas Struth, William Kentridge, Ionel Talpazan, Keith Haring, Tony Oursler, Mike Kelley, Abu Bakarr Mansaray, Peter Stichbury, Laurent Grasso, Pamela Breda, Alfonso Borragán, Greatest Hits, Trevor Paglen, William Adjété Wilson, Anton Vidokle, Angelo Vermeulen, Michael Buthe, Nicholas Schöffer, Gyula Kosice, Robert Dimatteo.  

Curated by Danielle Tilkin 

-----------------------------------

La exposición ARSTRONOMY aborda el cosmos desde distintos aspectos –lo astral, lo espacial, lo científico y lo ufológico– y reflexiona sobre el impacto que la investigación científica, los viajes espaciales y la ciencia ficción han tenido en el arte contemporáneo a través de una selección de obras de más de veinte artistas nacionales e internacionales. 

Los viajes espaciales, la ciencia ficción o la llegada del hombre a la Luna son temas presentes en el arte del siglo XX y, en muchos casos, han significado una fuente fundamental de inspiración, confrontación, reflexión y provocación. Esta connivencia entre ciencia e imaginación en la que la tecnología se da la mano con la ficción es lo que mejor define el concepto de la exposición ARSTRONOMY.

La muestra reúne a artistas nacionales e internacionales de distintas generaciones que, desde la década de 1950, han reflexionado, investigado o interpretado innumerables fenómenos en torno a lo astral, lo cósmico o lo científico para producir obras en las que la imaginación, la fantasía y la creatividad incursionan en el espacio, la política, la ciencia y la tecnología.

Comisariada por Danielle Tilkin, ARSTRONOMY aborda el cosmos desde distintos aspectos a través de fotografías, vídeos, pinturas y esculturas de varias generaciones de creadores como Paul van Hoeydonck, Joan Rabascall, Yves Klein, Rotraut, Julius Koller, Sigmar Polke, Panamarenko, Paul Laffoley, Mark Tansey, E.M.S. Evrugo mental state, Robert Llimós, Michael Zansky, Bob Smith, Susan Hiller, Thomas Ruff, Thomas Struth, William Kentridge, Ionel Talpazan, Keith Haring, Tony Oursler, Mike Kelley, Abu Bakarr Mansaray, Peter Stichbury, Laurent Grasso, Pamela Breda, Alfonso Borragán, Greatest Hits, Trevor Paglen, William Adjété Wilson, Anton Vidokle, Angelo Vermeulen, Michael Buthe, Nicholas Schöffer, Gyula Kosice y Robert Dimatteo.

En paralelo se programarán distintas actividades en torno a la muestra.

Peter Stichbury

 

 

Anatomy of a Phenomenon @ Tracy Williams, Ltd. NYC, until 15 November 2014 

Barbara Robbins, Westall High, 2014 Oil on linen 23.6 x 19.7 inches Photo: Jason Mandella 

Barbara Robbins, Westall High, 2014
Oil on linen
23.6 x 19.7 inches
Photo: Jason Mandella 

Balwyn, 1966 (Von Neumann Probe), 2014 Oil on linen 23.6 x 19.7 inches Photo: Jason Mandella 

Balwyn, 1966 (Von Neumann Probe), 2014
Oil on linen
23.6 x 19.7 inches
Photo: Jason Mandella 

Mona Stafford, 1976, 2014 Oil on linen 23.6 x 19.7 inches Photo: Jason Mandella 

Mona Stafford, 1976, 2014
Oil on linen
23.6 x 19.7 inches
Photo: Jason Mandella 

Rhodes, 1947, 2014 Oil on linen 23.6 x 19.7 inches Photo: Jason Mandella 

Rhodes, 1947, 2014
Oil on linen
23.6 x 19.7 inches
Photo: Jason Mandella 

Marco Eli Chereze, 2014 Oil on linen 23.6 x 19.7 inches Photo: Jason Mandella 

Marco Eli Chereze, 2014
Oil on linen
23.6 x 19.7 inches
Photo: Jason Mandella 

O'Hare Incident, 2006, 2014 Oil on linen 23.6 x 19.7 inches Photo: Jason Mandella 

O'Hare Incident, 2006, 2014
Oil on linen
23.6 x 19.7 inches
Photo: Jason Mandella 

Gordon Cooper, 2014 Oil on linen 23.6 x 19.7 inches Photo: Jason Mandella 

Gordon Cooper, 2014
Oil on linen
23.6 x 19.7 inches
Photo: Jason Mandella 

Kirtland Air Force Base, 1980, 2014 Oil on linen 23.6 x 19.7 inches Photo: Jason Mandella 

Kirtland Air Force Base, 1980, 2014
Oil on linen
23.6 x 19.7 inches
Photo: Jason Mandella 

Socorro, 1964, 2014 Oil on linen 32.4 x 47.2 inches Photo: Jason Mandella 

Socorro, 1964, 2014
Oil on linen
32.4 x 47.2 inches
Photo: Jason Mandella 

Experiencer, Ariel School, 1994, 2014 Oil on linen 23.6 x 19.7 inches Photo: Jason Mandella 

Experiencer, Ariel School, 1994, 2014
Oil on linen
23.6 x 19.7 inches
Photo: Jason Mandella 

Peter Stichbury
Anatomy of a Phenomenon Zine 24 Pages, 14.5 x 20.5 cm,  b/w Digital, Edition of 100, 2014

Anatomy of a Phenomenon Zine
24 Pages, 14.5 x 20.5 cm, 
b/w Digital, Edition of 100, 2014

Anatomy of a Phenomenon Zine 24 Pages, 14.5 x 20.5 cm,  b/w Digital, Edition of 100, 2014

Anatomy of a Phenomenon Zine
24 Pages, 14.5 x 20.5 cm, 
b/w Digital, Edition of 100, 2014



Peter Stichbury

                                                                     

Peter Stichbury